Perfume Types

Perfume Types

Perfume types reflect the concentration of aromatic compounds in a solvent, which in fine fragrance is typically ethanol or a mix of water and ethanol. Various sources differ considerably in the definitions of perfume types. The intensity and longevity of a perfume is based on the concentration, intensity and longevity of the aromatic compounds, or perfume oils, used. As the percentage of aromatic compounds increases, so does the intensity and longevity of the scent. Specific terms are used to describe a fragrance’s approximate concentration by the percent of perfume oil in the volume of the final product.

The most widespread terms are:

  • Parfum or extrait, in English known as perfume extract, pure perfume, or simply perfume: 15–40% (IFRA: typical ~20%) aromatic compounds
  • Esprit de Parfum (ESdP): 15–30% aromatic compounds, a seldom used strength concentration in between EdP and perfume
  • Eau de Parfum (EdP), Parfum de Toilette (PdT): 10–20% (typical ~15%) aromatic compounds, sometimes listed as “eau de perfume” or “millésime”; Parfum de Toilette is a less common term, most popular in the 1980s, that is generally analogous to Eau de Parfum
  • Eau de Toilette (EdT): 5–15% (typical ~10%) aromatic compounds
  • Eau de Cologne (EdC), often simply called cologne: 3–8% (typical ~5%) aromatic compounds; see below for more information on the confusing nature of the term “cologne”
  • In addition to these widely seen concentrations, companies have marketed a variety of perfumed products under the name of “splashes,” “mists,” “veils” and other imprecise terms. Generally these products contain 3% or less aromatic compounds.

 

More Details by : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perfume

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